Jane Fraser is an award-winning writer of short story, historical fiction, memoir and haibun. She lives and works in Llangennith, a small village at the north-western edge of the Gower peninsula, south Wales, in a house facing the sea which bears the full brunt of the south-westerly wind.

 
 

Her writing is infused with the tone of this prevailing wind, so much so, that as an homage, she has titled her first collection of short stories, The South Westerlies. This collection is to be published by SALT, one of the UK’s foremost independent publishers of literary fiction, in 2019 – its 20th anniversary.

You can order a copy of The South Westerlies (Published 15/06/19) from:

SALT Publishing | AMAZON | BERTRAM BOOKS

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LATEST NEWS

Wednesday, 5th June 2019  2.00pm at Taliesin Create
Swansea University SA2 8PP

Jane Fraser goes back to Swansea University where she studied for her MA and PhD in Creative Writing to talk about The South Westerlies and much more with author and Creative Writing Lecturer, Alan Bilton.

Admission free. All welcome. Refreshments available.

Tuesday, 2nd July 2019 (Time tbc)
The House of St Barnabus, 1 Greek Street, London W1D 4NQ

An ‘Under the Covers’ discussion with Ella Berthoud, bibliotherapist and author of ‘The Novel Cure’ about The South Westerlies and who knows what else at Ella’s regular monthly literary salon in Soho.

Ticketed. Details to follow.

Thursday, 25th July, 2019 7.30pm at Tabernacle Chapel, Mumbles SA3 4
(junction of Newton Road and Chapel Street)

Cover to Cover, Wales’ regional finalist independent book shop of the year 2019, will host a Q&A session between Jane Fraser and Mumbles’ Sarah Samuel, where the focus will be on Jane’s newly published short-fiction collection, The South Westerlies (SALT Publishing) and all things booky!

Ticketed. Refreshments available. All welcome. More details to follow.



 
Fraser’s stories are compellingly told and carefully crafted. She shares a heightened, acute sense of language with Annie Proulx and the right to comparison with such a prose stylist is properly won. And just as Proulx claims the lodgepole pines and wide-skied landscape of Wyoming as her own so too does Jane Fraser take the wind-flensed land’s edge of north Gower and make it hers. She has given this reader, at least, what he so often desires, namely the tang and sharpness of savouring language seemingly newly minted.
— Jon Gower, Novelist, Short Story and Travel Writer, Historian and Broadcaster
 

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